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HEARTWORM AWARENESS

April is heartworm awareness month. It only takes one infected animal to put an entire population at risk. Learn more about heartworm protection by visiting The Heartworm Society.

THE CENTER FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have created www.coronavirus.gov, where you can obtain information on precautions to take to minimize the chances of contracting the virus at home, at work, and out in the world. The recommendations for Covid-19 are changing as officials learn more about the virus, so it is essential to monitor the site for updates.

THE AMERICAN VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

For information specific to the veterinary industry, The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) is an excellent resource.

They also provide COVID-19 FAQs for Pet Owners.

WASHINGTON STATE VETERINARY MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

MANAGING YOUR CAT’S STRESS

Do you know that your cat's environment can have a major impact on how they feel? Urinary issues (like not using the litter box or painful urination) might be triggered by stress.

The good news is there are some simple things you can do to help manage cat's stress. Download and share 10 TIPS TO HELP RELIEVE YOUR CAT'S STRESS today so you can start learning more ways to make your cat (and cat's bladder) happy and healthy.

Source: Hill’s Pet Nutrition Inc.

Learn more about managing your cat’s stress.

ANAPLASMOSIS

Anaplasmosis is a tick-borne disease. Two forms of anaplasmosis are known: granulocytic anaplasmosis and infectious cyclic thrombocytopenia. Granulocytic anaplasmosis is more common. A dog can have both infections at the same time.

For more information please read the following: Anaplasmosis

ITCHING AND ALLERGY IN DOGS

Coping with an itchy pet can be an extremely frustrating experience for a pet owner and can truly test the limits of the human-animal bond. Persistent scratching and chewing by a dog can also result in open wounds to the skin and pain to your pet. The following information is intended to help provide pet owners with a basic understanding of the most common underlying causes of itching and allergies in small animals. Here’s a summary of the most common underlying causes of itching and allergies in small animals: Itching and Allergy in Dogs

DIABETES MELLITUS

What is Diabetes Mellitus?

In order to understand the problems involved in diabetes mellitus it is necessary to understand something of the normal body's sugar metabolism.

Diabetes mellitus is caused by a deficiency of insulin. You are probably going to have to give injections of insulin as a replacement. (Don't worry. It's easier than you think).

The main symptoms of diabetes mellitus are excessive urination, excessive thirst, excessive appetite, and weight loss. Treatment should control these symptoms. Watching for these symptoms is the best way to know how your pet is doing.

Continue reading here: Diabetes Mellitus: Introduction

IDIOPATHIC CYSTITUS IN CATS

Feline lower urinary tract disease is the term describing the following group of clinical signs regardless of cause:

  • bloody urine

  • straining to urinate (can easily be mistaken for straining to defecate)

  • urinating in unusual places

  • urinary blockage (almost exclusively a male cat problem and constitutes an emergency)

  • licking the urinary opening (usually due to pain).

A cat need only demonstrate some of these signs to be considered affected.

Continue reading here: Idiopathic Cystitus in Cats

CUSHING’S SYNDROME

Cushing’s Syndrome (Hyperadrenocorticism): Description

This condition represents a classical excess in cortisone-type hormone circulation in the body; it's a relatively common hormone imbalance. Both cats and dogs can be affected (though it is primarily a dog's disease) and the onset is insidious.

Continue reading here: Cushing's Syndrome

THYROID TREATMENT USING RADIOTHERAPY FOR CATS

Imaging with Nuclear Medicine and Treatment by Radiotherapy

This therapy is generally considered the safest and most effective method of treatment for feline hyperthyroidism.

Your cat will be given an injection of radioactive iodine (iodine 131) and kept in the facility until the radiation levels have reduced adequately to allow the cat to return home (usually three to four days). Treatment is not invasive and most cats tolerate brief separation from home without significant stress.

TPLO (TIBIAL PLATEAU LEVELING OSTEOTOMY) IN DOGS

If your dog has been diagnosed with a torn cranial cruciate ligament, you will probably be considering surgical treatment options that may include a tibial plateau leveling osteotomy (TPLO).  The procedure is tough enough to say, let alone understand!  The development of the TPLO is one of the most interesting stories in veterinary medicine.

Continue reading: TPLO